Home / Food / Kids Snacking - United Kingdom - May 2015

Kids Snacking - United Kingdom - May 2015

Published: May 2015 | No Of Pages: 43 | Published By: Mintel

Product Synopsis

Almost all parents bought snacks for their child in the six months to March 2015. Also reflective of the ingrained nature of kids’ snacking is that three quarters of children snack at least once a day.
Overview
 
What you need to know
Product covered in this report
Abbreviations
 
Executive Summary
 
Universal infant free school meals pose a threat to kids’ snacking
Media spotlight on sugar affects kids’ snacking
Kinder tops advertising expenditure
Kids’ snacks look to boost fun factor
On-the-go children’s snacks attract launches in 2014
Nine in 10 parents buy sweet snacks
Figure 1: Snacks bought by parents, by category, March 2015
Figure 2: Snacks bought by parents, March 2015
Unhealthy snacks deemed acceptable in small portions
Figure 3: Attitudes towards kids’ snacking, March 2015
Healthier versions of kids’ favourite treats gain the most interest among parents
Figure 4: Interest in selected product concepts, March 2015
Taste is king for children
Figure 5: Most important choice factors for children when buying snacks, March 2015
 
Issues and Insights
 
Unrefined sugar sources offer route for operators to address health concerns
The facts
The implications
Free school meal scheme poses a threat to kids’ snacking
The facts
The implications
Interest in kids’ snacks with added protein presents NPD opportunity
The facts
The implications
 
The Market – What You Need To Know
 
Universal Infant Free School Meals pose a threat to the market
Growth in the number of 10-14-year-olds good news for kids’ snacking
Negative media focus on sugar puts pressure on manufacturers
Children’s intake of fruit/vegetables is on the decline
 
Market Drivers
 
Changes to school lunches represent a threat to kids’ snacking
Growth in number of children good news for the market
Figure 6: Trends in the age structure of the UK population, 2009-14 and 2014-19
Sugar attracts negative media in 2014
Fewer than one in five children reach 5-a-day fruit and vegetables target
Figure 7: Trends in the prevalence of eating five or more portions of fruit and vegetables per day, by sex, 2001-13
 
Key Players – What You Need To Know
 
On-the-go children’s snacks attract launches in 2014
Kerry Foods launch innovative yogurt snack
Kinder tops advertising expenditure
Mondelez’s Barny cakes focus on ‘kitchen cupboard’ ingredients
 
Launch Activity and Innovation
 
NPD in kids’ snacking drops in 2014
Figure 8: Index of new product launches in kids’ snacking market in the UK, 2010-14
Fruit snacks mimic sugar confectionery to boost appeal with children
Yogurt explores different designs to boost the fun factor
Kid versions of regular snacks
Minority think kids’ snacks are more suitable than adults’ snacks
On-the-go children’s snacks attract launches in 2014
Figure 9: NPD in the UK kids’ snacking market, top 15 claims, 2010-14
 
Brand Communication and Promotion
 
Kinder tops advertising expenditure
Figure 10: Advertising expenditure on ten selected kids’ snacking brands 2010-15*
Babybel introduces Babybel Buddies characters
Barny cakes focus on kitchen cupboard ingredients
Haribo second largest spender with the launch of two new TV adverts
Petits Filous Magic Squares backed by marketing push
 
The Consumer – What You Need To Know
 
Nine in ten parents buy sweet snacks
Snack brands linked to a wider healthy lifestyle appeal
Openness among parents to ‘light’ snack products for children
Kids’ snacks with added protein appeal to one in four parents
Taste most important to children
 
Snacks Bought by Parents
 
Nine in 10 parents buy sweet snacks
Figure 11: Snacks bought by parents, by category, March 2015
Figure 12: Snacks bought by parents, March 2015
Fresh fruit most popular snack bought by parents
One in three parents buy breakfast biscuits
 
Attitudes towards Kids’ Snacking
 
Three in four parents agree unhealthy snacks are OK in small portions
Figure 13: Attitudes towards kids’ snacking, March 2015
Minority think kids’ snacks are more suitable than adults’ snacks
Homemade snacks preferred by half of parents
‘Light’ snacks widely accepted by parents
 
Product Enticements for Kids’ Snacks
 
Healthier versions of kids’ favourite treats gain the most interest among parents
Figure 14: Interest in selected product concepts, March 2015
Kids’ snacks with reduced sugar appeal
Alternatives to white sugar appeal to one in four
Plant-derived sweeteners deemed more acceptable
Snacks with benefits
Kids’ snacks with added protein attract interest from one in four parents
Wholegrain kids’ snacks appeal to one in three parents
 
Kids’ Usage of Snacks
 
Three in four children snack at least once a day
Figure 15: Frequency of kids’ snacking, March 2015
Figure 16: Time of day when snacks are eaten by children, March 2015
Four in 10 children eat snacks as part of a lunchbox
Figure 17: Kids’ snacking occasions, March 2015
Taste is rated as the most important factor by three in four children
Figure 18: Most important choice factors for children when buying snacks, March 2015
Half of children buy snacks because they are fun to eat
Snacks that are filling important to one in three children
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